All Season Tires Vs Summer Tires

All Season Tires Vs Summer Tires

When debating between all-season tires vs summer tires, the differences between the two types can be easily misunderstood. Depending on your vehicle, driving conditions, and personal preferences, one may be a better option than the other. When choosing between summer and all-season tires, it helps to understand the benefits and limitations of each.

ALL-SEASON TIRES

An all-season tire offers a balance of capabilities, providing acceptable performance in wet and dry conditions, as well as traction in snow.

Built for the average driver, all-season tires have moderate tread depths and rubber compounds that are engineered to provide longer tread life than summer tires, which have shallower tread depths. All-season tires are offered in many types/models, sizes, load capacities, and speed ratings for use on a wide variety of vehicles from economy cars to sedans to mini-vans to pickup trucks. They tend to provide ride comfort, handling, and other performance attributes suitable for most drivers.

all-season tire features

All-season tires perform well in warm weather, but they may offer less grip than summer tires, sacrificing some steering, braking, and cornering capabilities. This trade-off is necessary for all-season tires to be able to provide acceptable performance in light winter conditions and provide longer tread life.

All-season tires are capable of providing traction in winter but are not the best tire to use in extreme winter driving conditions. Drivers who encounter extreme winter weather may want to consider switching to snow tires in the winter.

Because all-season tires offer a blend of summer and winter performance, they are often a good option for drivers in moderate climates and driving conditions.

SUMMER TIRES

Summer tires are ideal for high-performance vehicles and are built for speed and agility. They offer increased responsiveness, cornering, and braking capabilities. This is typically attributed to specialized tread patterns and rubber compounds that allow for improved precision on the road. The tread patterns of summer tires have less grooving and put more rubber in contact with the road. They are design­ed to provide maximum road-holding grip. The tread compounds of summer tires are designed to remain more flexible, allowing for better traction and grip. Summer tires may have shallower tread depths that allow for more stability when pushed closer to their limits.

summer tire features

Dimensional characteristics (such as the tire’s width, aspect ratio, and rim diameter), speed capability, and other design features make summer tires more suitable and capable for increased performance in wet and dry conditions on high-performance, sports-oriented vehicles. Surprising to some, summer tires such as our Potenza S-04 Pole Position provide better performance in wet driving conditions, thanks to unique tread patterns that help evacuate water and resist hydroplaning.

When it comes to winter driving, all-season tires may be more suitable, given their blend of summer and winter performance capabilities, but we recommend considering making the switch to winter tires to get optimal traction and performance in extreme winter conditions.

CHOOSING THE RIGHT TIRE

Choosing the right tire isn’t as simple as mounting a set and never looking back. When contemplating between summer and all-season tire, consider your driving conditions, the climate you live in, and performance needs.

It is best that all tires on your vehicle are the same type of tire – such as winter tires, all-season tires, etc. Your vehicle’s tires should meet the manufacturer’s recommended size, speed rating, load capacity, as well as any other recommended specifications.

All Season Tires Or Winter Tires?

It’s time to get some traction.

At any time now, snow could fall over a broad swath of America, and that means your tires need to be checked.

Experts say if the rubber is worn, you could slide, crash or get stuck, even in a light snowfall. Depending on where you live and how badly you need to get someplace in bad weather, you might want winter tires. All-season tires might be an option, but they won’t start and stop as well in ice and snow.

Experts say late October is a good time to shop for tires and get them installed so you’re ready. Here’s how to figure out whether you need new tires and tips from experts on what kind of rubber to buy:

Check the tread depth: Stick a quarter into the tire grooves at several spots with George Washington’s head upside down. If you can see the top of Washington’s hair, you have 4/32 of an inch of tread or less. That means it’s about time to replace your tires. You may have a little time left in warm, dry weather, but tires with less than 4/32 won’t grip well in ice and snow. People used to use a penny to check tread depth. But if the top of Abraham Lincoln’s head can be seen, that means you’ve only got 2/32 inches of tread left. “At that point, most tires are basically worn out and need to be replaced immediately,” says Gene Petersen, tire program manager for Consumer Reports, which does extensive tire testing.

Winter or all-season? It depends on where you live, how urgently you need to be somewhere in the snow, and whether your vehicle is 2-wheel-drive or all-wheel-drive. In an area with moderate snowfall, you probably can get by with all-season tires, especially if you can wait for plows to clear roads before going anywhere. Generally, But to the north, where heavy snowfall is more likely, winter tires will be better. If the engine powers all four of your wheels, good all-season tires may suffice. Generally, winter tires on a two-wheel-drive vehicle grip better than all-season tires on a four-wheel-drive vehicle. Experts say all-wheel-drive makes a big difference starting off in the snow. But it won’t help you stop in snow. That’s where winter tires come in. They’ll stop faster in slippery conditions because they grip ice and snow better due to specially designed soft tread compounds. In bad weather, winter tires grip almost like they’re being driven on dry roads.

Read the reviews: If you decide to go with all-season tires, make sure you read test reports and consumer ratings. All-season tires vary wildly in their ability to grip the snow, The gap from good to bad is staggering, you should stick to well-known brands for the best performance. If you choose winter tires, also read reviews. Tire Rack’s tests show less of variance between snow tires from different brands. Deeper grooves generally mean more snow traction, but you can’t always tell performance from looking at a tire. Although winter tires have improved, they still compromise dry-pavement handling for snow and ice performance.

Replace all four tires: Putting snow tires on just the two drive wheels can make your car difficult to handle in snow and ice. When two wheels on one axle grip better than the other two, it creates a handling imbalance that could be treacherous if you’re trying to stop quickly or steer around something. Those are the situations where you need your car to work best, an emergency situation..

The price: Snow and all-season tires generally cost about the same. Consumer Reports found that sedan tires average around $145 each. SUV tires average $178 apiece. Shopping around could get you a better deal. Make sure the price includes mounting and balancing.

Buy early: Experts say now is the time to buy, when there’s time to do research and there’s an abundant selection of snow or all-season tires. If you wait until the first snowfall, you might get stuck with what the dealer has on hand in the size that fits your car. But don’t buy too soon: We recommend installing winter tires when the daily high temperature is generally below 50 degrees.

How Often Do I Need A Tire Rotation?

You care about your car and know it’s important to have your tires rotated at regular intervals. You also know that getting this done evens out tire wear, which means better handling and traction for you. But what exactly are “regular intervals”? Learn how often you should get a tire rotation, what’s typically involved in the service, and how it can save you from having to buy new tires down the road. That’s more money in your pocket for the things you care about!

How often should I get my tires rotated?

About every 7,500 miles or 6 months.

Most vehicle manufacturers recommend that you get your tires rotated approximately every 7,500 miles or six months. However, some vehicles are exceptions and it’s always best to refer to your owner’s manual. This number can change depending on how, where, and what you drive. Simplify things by making it a habit to get your tires rotated every time you get your oil changed.

What is involved in a tire rotation?

Tires are removed, swapped, and remounted.

Tire rotation consists of switching the front and rear tires. It’s crucial to do this because the drive tires (i.e. front tires in front wheel drive vehicles) work harder than the others. If you don’t swap them out, these tires will wear down faster. By rotating your tires, you distribute the burden among all four tires and ensure they wear down evenly. Take a look at the tire rotation pattern below and you’ll see! At Firestone Complete Auto Care, our expert technicians remove, swap, and remount your tires so they live longer and drive safer.

Tire Rotation Pattern

How do regular tire rotations help me?

By helping you save money and drive safer.

Regular tire rotations reduce your risk of various tire problems—most obviously, tire failure or blowout. By regularly rotating your tires, you’ll be less likely to experience those, reducing your risk for an inconvenient and even potentially dangerous situation. Tire rotations also help improve traction and fuel efficiency by ensuring your tires wear down evenly. This increases the lifespan of your tires, meaning you’ll save money in the long run.

Getting your tires rotated is key to getting the best performance from both your tires and your vehicle. If you can’t remember the last time you had your tires rotated, there’s a pretty good chance they’re overdue for this important service. Make an appointment for a tire rotation at Lofton Motorsports today! We’ll get you rotated and rolling in no time.

Spring Into Vehicle Maintenance With This Checklist

Now that winter is just a memory, millions of Americans will take to the roads to enjoy the warmer weather. It’s time to perform some Car care spring is the perfect time of year to make sure your vehicle is ready for the upcoming travel season.

Whether you’re driving across the country or driving across town,

Exterior:

  • Wiper blades play an extremely important role in increasing visibility. Replace every six months or when cracked, cut, torn, streaking or chattering.
  • Check the tires. A simple test to check tire tread depth is to insert a penny into the tread of the tire. If the top of Lincoln’s head sticks out, your tires are starting to show signs of wear and should be replaced. Also, check the tire inflation and inspect the tread for uneven wear, which could indicate the need for a wheel alignment. Also look for bulges and bald spots.
  • Give your car a good washing from top to bottom. Use a product specifically made for automobiles. Always clean the tires and wheels before washing the body, and don’t use the same mitt for both.
  • If you find minor paint damage, cover the paint chips as quickly as possible. For a quick fix until you can get some touchup supplies, dab a little clear nail polish on the scratch.
  • Spring is an excellent time for waxing, which not only protects the finish but also makes subsequent washing easier. Before proceeding, make sure there are no foreign particles on the paint.

Under the Hood:

  • A good rule of thumb is that a change of season equals a change of oil. Changing your car’s oil and filter every three months or 3,000 miles, whichever comes first, will ensure that your car operates at peak efficiency.
  • Get a tune-up if necessary. As part of the 21st Century Tune-Up on today’s modern vehicles, the following systems should be inspected: battery, charging and starting, engine mechanical, powertrain control (including onboard diagnostic checks), fuel, ignition, and emissions.
  • Check all fluids. There are several fluids that require attention, including engine oil, power steering fluid, brake and transmission fluids, windshield washer solvent and antifreeze/coolant. The antifreeze/coolant should be refreshed every two years.
  • Check hoses and belts. A belt that fails can affect the electrical system, air conditioning, and power steering, as well as the cooling system. Cooling system hoses may be deteriorating from within, so old hoses and clamps that appear to be in marginal condition may need to be replaced.

Under the Vehicle:

  • Spring is a good time to check the entire brake system, including brake linings, rotors, and drums.
  • Check the shocks or struts for signs of physical damage, such as leaking, rusting, or dents. Also be aware of the warning signs that you may need them replaced: vehicle rolls or sways on turns, front end dives when braking, rear end squats when accelerating, vehicle sits lower in the front or rear, a loss of directional control during sudden stops, and the vehicle bounces or slides sideways on a winding and rough road.
  • If you notice any fluid puddles or stains under your vehicle, it is a good idea to have it inspected. There are several fluids that can leak from the vehicle including antifreeze/coolant, battery acid, brake fluid, clear water, diesel fuel, engine oil, gasoline, gear oil, power steering fluid, shock and strut fluid, transmission fluid and windshield washer fluid.

Lofton Motorsports offers inspections and all vehicle maintenance for your needs! Come visit us and we’ll make sure you’re safe on the road.

5 Tips to Remember for Driving Safely in the Rain

Driving in the rain

Singing in the rain is fun. But driving in it? Not so much. Driving in light or heavy floods, or even just rainy, stormy conditions can be anxiety inducing. According to the U.S. Department of Transportation, there are on average more than 950,000 automobile accidents each year due to wet pavement, resulting in approximately 4,700 deaths and 384,000 injuries.

Being behind the wheel with a rain-splattered windshield doesn’t have to be a white-knuckled, nerve-racking experience. Tips and techniques for driving in a downpour:

  1. Think. Many people drive subconsciously, out of habit, when it rains, people often don’t adjust their thinking. When conditions are less than ideal, drivers need to stay alert and focused on what’s going on around them.
  2. Turn on those headlights. It’s the law in all states to turn on headlights when visibility is low, and many states also require having the headlights on when the windshield wipers are in use. Well-working wipers and relatively new (not threadbare) tires are must-haves when driving in rain, especially when driving at high speeds on the highway.
  3. Beware of hydroplaning. Hydroplaning is the technical term for what occurs when your tires lose traction with the road due to excess water on top of the road. The result is that your vehicle begins to slide uncontrollably. It’s easy to hydroplane: all you need is one-twelfth of an inch of rain on the road and a speed of more than 35 miles per hours. If your tires have extensive wear and tear, you are more highly likely to hydroplane. You can hydroplane even if you are driving a four-wheel drive car, SUV, or truck. 

    If you start to hydroplane, let off the accelerator (gas pedal) slowly, and steer straight until you regain control. If your car starts to spin, turn your wheel in the direction that the vehicle is spinning, slowly. Do not turn your wheel against the direction it has begun to spin. Do not jerk the wheel sharply in one direction or the other, as you could flip your car due to over correction

    Consider taking a driving course through your local DMV to learn how to drive safer on wet roads and better avoid hydroplaning.  
  4. Turn off cruise control. Ironically, on rain- or snow- slick surfaces, cruise control may cause you to lose control. You might think it’ll help you stay at one steady speed, but if you hydroplane while you’re in cruise control, your car will actually go faster.
  5. Slow down. Speed limit signs are designed for ideal conditions, which means driving when you have little traffic and good visibility. That’s hardly the environment you’re driving in when it’s raining. So, let up on the accelerator and allow more time to get to your destination.
  6. Be extra cautious with merging lanes. Motorists should drive defensively and take precautions when passing vehicles to prevent merging collisions.

Extra precautions might help ease the anxiety associated with driving in the rain, making it safer for everyone. If a crash does happen, make sure you know the steps to take after a crash.

What to do When Your Car Is Faded

auto tips paint car

Protecting your skin from harmful UV rays at the beach is a given for us humans. But those same UV rays can also damage your car, causing it to fade over time. You likely don’t think about your car’s paint job until it starts to get noticeably lighter. This is due to the oxidization from the UV rays of the sun. On top of that, extreme weather due to snow, hail, high winds and rain can all have an impact on the hue of your car — not to mention the critters that can really do a number on your paint job.

Here are some tips on keeping your car’s paint job looking new year after year:

Come up with a washing schedule: Prevention is key here, so the best way to protect your car from the sun and environmental damage is to keep up with a consistent washing schedule. Praying for a rain storm isn’t going to help. You need a good clean that can protect your top coat from existing and future damage. Top coat is like sunscreen for your car, and keeping it as clean as possible is like giving it SPF 50 protection. However, that top coat is also the most vulnerable to sand, salt, snow and acid rain.

Restore the paint job: Once fading begins, you may think it’s too late to be saved. Not true. You will have to break out the elbow grease but restoration of your paint job is absolutely possible. First, you’ll need to thoroughly wash and dry your car, then use a clay bar to remove the junk that’s contributing to the dullness factor. Clay is designed to “fix” a contaminated surface — one that is plagued with tiny bumps in the paint that can detract from its smoothness. All that embedded debris can cause small imperfections in your finish that the clay bar can pick up and remove, says Dr. Beasley’s. Doing this will provide a prime surface featuring a tighter seal to the wax making sure it looks better and lasts longer.

Polish after claying: The clay bar is great, but it’s no substitute for polishing your car. Do this in a shady area, out of direct sunlight. Make sure your car is cool to the touch and not hot. Work in small, concentrated areas and always follow the manufacturer’s instructions. Normally, you would use a foam applicator but once light oxidization and fading has occurred, it’s best to use a microfiber applicator pad for car polish application.

Wax your car regularly: If a clean top coat adds an extra layer of protection for your car, adding wax gives you yet another protective layer that prevents dirt from harming your car. Not only does it make your paint job look beautiful and shiny, it can give you a whole new level of SPF protection that can complement the efforts of your washing schedule.You have four types of wax products to selection from: liquid, paste, spray and wipe-on, wipe-off. The paste and liquid formulas seem to work the best when a car is faded or oxidized car paint. Ideally, you should wax before the winter, then keep up with maintenance every two to three months.

Take it to the pros: If all of the above methods don’t work and your car’s finish is too badly faded, oxidized or damaged, you may need a complete paint job. Whether as part of collision repair or a simple desire to get your paint job restored, professionals have the right equipment, tools and paint to bring that luster and sheen to your car that you miss so much.

paint-tips-car

Contact Lofton Motorsport’s In Tulsa

Located conveniently on Tulsa, OK. Lofton Motorsport’s is your first choice for paint restoration, collision repair and auto body work. Contact us at (918) 747-7566 to schedule an appointment

How Paintless Dent Repair Works

paintless dent repair

Paintless dent repair, known for short as PDR, is an environmentally-friendly way of repairing a vehicle that has been in an accident. Essentially, it’s a method of restoring a vehicle’s body to a factory-like condition within a smaller time frame and at a fraction of the cost of full-on auto body repair.

Because it’s a much less invasive process for dent repair, it is designed for small to medium repair needs. Larger dents and issues will require auto body repair, panel removal, etc. Technicians skilled in PDR use state-of-the-art technologies to get beneath the vehicle’s “skin” and gently coax dented panels back into position without making scratches or compromising the paint job. It’s ideal for addressing damage caused by hail, dings, creases and small dents.

The PDR process involves the technician first assessing the damage, then gaining entry to the dent and taking a closer look. Finally, he or she will apply slow pressure to work the dent out.

How Does it Work?

Let’s go into more detail on the steps discussed above.

Damage assessment is the first step. This allows technicians to see the extent of the damage and determine if PDR is indeed the right way to go. Between 80 and 90 percent of all dents are able to be removed through PDR. Then, the technician will prepare the area around the dent before attempting the repair.

Next up, it’s necessary to gain entry to the dent, which is typically from the back side, necessitating the removal of body panels, tail lights and even interior panels in some cases. Essentially, the technician has to create a pathway to the dent area.

Your technician will use a special light to gain visual access to the area, which gives off a shadow. This helps the technician know precisely where the tools should be placed to massage the area back into its original position. This slow pressure takes some time and precision.

Most times, PDR can be done on the same day you bring your car in. Of course, the exact time frame will depend on the dent’s severity and how hard it is to access it.

Paintless Dent Repair vs. Traditional Dent Repair

Traditional dent repair involves filling dented areas with paint or body filler, to be matched to the rest of the exterior. This can make your car look like new, but it still doesn’t offer a sustainable, long-term solution. In addition, it’s more costly than paintless dent repair, more time-consuming, and negatively impacts the re-sale value of your vehicle.

With paintless dent repair, there is no need for fillers or sanding. For minor repairs, PDR is a quicker, more cost-effective alternative all the way around.

Contact Lofton Motorsport’s in Tulsa

If you require our services for paintless dent repair in and around Tulsa, contact us at (918) 747-7566 or visit us In Tulsa.

How To Add Liquid To Coolant Recovery System

If your car has a coolant recovery system, you can check the level of liquid on the side of the plastic reservoir. You just open the cap on the reservoir to check whether the coolant looks as though it needs changing or to add water and coolant. Many vehicles have a pressurized coolant recovery system called an expansion tank that makes opening the radiator unnecessary. These systems are considered “sealed” because the safety pressure cap is on the recovery reservoir rather than on the radiator.

  • If you overfill the system, the extra liquid gets hot, expands, and flows out of the overflow pipe. That may not seem too terrible, but because coolant is toxic, it can harm animals or children, who love its sweet taste.
  • If you don’t have coolant on hand and you just need to add a little liquid to the cooling system, plain old tap water will do. But try to maintain a good coolant level by adding a similar amount of straight coolant the next time you add liquid to the system.

You will probably never need to open the cap on the radiator, but if you have to open the cap for any reason, make sure to fill the radiator to the top with a 50/50 mixture of coolant and water before replacing the cap. This addition bleeds the system by forcing any air that may have gotten into the system into the reservoir and out through its overflow pipe when the engine heats up. Follow these steps when adding liquid to the coolant recovery system:

Adding cold liquid to an engine that’s hot can crack the engine block because the hot metal contracts sharply when the cold liquid hits it.

  1. Check the liquid level.

    Look at the outside of the reservoir to see where the level of the liquid in it lies relative to the “MAX” and “MIN” lines embossed on the side, as shown here.

    A coolant recovery reservoir (a) and a cap being removed safely from a radiator (b).

    A coolant recovery reservoir (a) and a cap being removed safely from a radiator (b).
  2. Lift the lever on the safety cap to allow the pressure to escape.

    To keep from burning your hand, place a cloth over the cap after you raise the lever. Then turn the cap counterclockwise to remove it.

  3. If the liquid level is low, add equal parts coolant and water to the reservoir.

    Add equal parts coolant and water until the level reaches the “MAX” line on the side of the container.

Worn Tires

When Is It Time To Replace My Tires?

Tire ReplacementThere are many things that factor into tire replacement. A flat tire or tire that is visibly damaged are obvious reasons. But what are the more common factors? The lifespan of a tire depends on a combination of influences including, the driver’s driving habits, climate, road conditions, tire design, and proper tire maintenance. The big three things to consider:

    1. Tread Wear – Proper tread depth is essential to prevent hydroplaning and skidding. The minimum tread depth is 2/32nd of an inch (1.6 mm).you can use a penny to check tread depth. Simply place the penny upside down into a tread groove. If you can see all of Lincoln’s head, it’s time for tire replacement.

Advanced and unusual wear can reduce the ability of tread to properly grip the road in adverse conditions. Visually check tires for uneven wear, looking for high and low areas or unusually smooth areas and any signs of damage. Motorists should also check sidewalls for gouges, cuts, bulges or other irregularities.

    2. Climate – The heat of summer and cold of winter can wreak havoc on your tires. Too much exposure to direct sunlight, UV rays, and/or heat, can cause cracking in your tires. If the vehicle is parked outside in the elements, and is not driven with frequency, this can accelerate the process. Extreme cold can also factor into tire wear.
    3. Tire Age – Tires are designed and built to provide many thousands of miles of excellent service. For maximum benefit, tires must be maintained properly to avoid tire damage and abuse that may result in tire disablement. The service life of a tire is a cumulative function of the storage, stowing, rotation and service conditions, which a tire is subjected to throughout its life (load, speed, inflation pressure, road hazard injury, etc.). Since service conditions vary widely, accurately predicting the service life of any specific tire in chronological time is not possible.

Lofton Motorsports is unaware of any technical data that supports a specific tire age for removal from service. However, as with other members of the tire and automotive industries, Lofton Motorsports recommends that all tires (including spare tires) that were manufactured more than ten (10) years previous be removed from service and be replaced with new tires, even when tires appear to be usable from their external appearance and if the tread depth may have not reached the minimum wear out depth. Vehicle manufacturers may recommend a different chronological age at which a tire should be replaced based on their understanding of the specific vehicle application; Lofton Motorsports recommends that any such instruction be followed. Consumers should note that most tires would have to be removed for tread wear-out or other causes before any prescribed removal period. A stated removal period in no way reduces the consumer’s responsibility for tire replacement as needed.

Lofton Motorsports recommends that you regularly inspect your tires. An inspection of the tires should be incorporated during routine vehicle maintenance procedures. If tire damage is suspected or found, it should be carefully assessed by a trained tire specialist immediately.

Synthetic Oil

Synthetic oil vs. Conventional Oil

Conventional and synthetic oils begin in the ground. But that’s where the similarities end. 

Synthetic oil is not only refined but also distilled, purified and broken down into its basic molecules. This process not only removes more impurities from the crude oil but also enables individual molecules in the oil to be tailored to the demands of modern engines. These customized molecules provide higher levels of protection and performance than conventional oils. But the synthetic base oil is only half the story. The correct blend additives must go into the mix to create the oil.

Our Synthetic Oil has a unique, balanced formulation to keep your engine running like new. So what are the benefits of using professionals? We will pick the correct oil for your needs like Synthetics typically outperform conventional motor oils in providing more protection for your vehicle. Here’s how all that chemistry translates to the real world.

Synthetic motor oil keeping your engine clean

Keep your engine cleaner
As oil circulates through your engine it can pick up deposits. Over time, conventional oils can sometimes form sludge, which can reduce your engine’s efficiency and, ultimately, reduce the life of your engine. Synthetic oils contain fewer impurities compared to conventional motor oils and can better resist the formation of sludge thereby preventing deposits from forming in your engine.


Synthetic motor oil for engine wear protection

Offer greater engine wear protection
Engine parts are in constant contact with each other. They’re also moving at high speeds. In the extreme environment of your engine, components can wear and break down. Your motor oil is the protective barrier between these components. As conventional oils break down, their ability to prevent engine wear diminishes. Synthetic motor oils, on the other hand, retain their wear protection properties for a much longer time, increasing engine life.


Mobil 1™ oil in car driving in cold weather with snow on ground and trees

Flow better in low temperatures
When your car sits for awhile (let’s say overnight) the oil settles. But, when you fire up the ignition, it begins flowing through critical engine parts to protect against friction. With conventional oils, it takes more time until they are able to flow smoothly through the engine. During the cold winter months, or if you live in an extremely cold environment, this flow process takes even longer. Synthetic motor oils, however, are engineered to flow quickly even at low temperatures, and they start protecting your engine right after you start your car.


Synthetic oil in car protects in desert high temperatures

Protect better at high temperatures
When running, engines are hot. Really, really hot. Over time, the high temperatures in your engine can cause conventional motor oils to break down or evaporate exposing your engine to wear. Synthetic motor oils are engineered to resist these high temperatures, which is especially important if you’re driving in hot climates.


Synthetic oil protects turbocharger engine parts

Protect critical turbocharger parts
To meet consumer demand, automakers are building cars with smaller engines (for greater fuel efficiency) but adding turbochargers (to boost power). We already mentioned how engines run at high temperatures, which can break down conventional oils faster, but today’s turbocharged engines are even more aggressive. The shaft inside a turbocharger can spin upwards of 200,000 revolutions per minute, so it’s critical that your motor oil can get to that shaft and lubricate it properly very quickly. Conventional oils can break down faster under these conditions and leave deposits on turbocharger components, which can lead to failure. Synthetic oil can protect these components much better than conventional oils, keeping them operating at peak performance and boosting your engine’s power.


 

 

Air Conditioning

Signs Your Central Air Conditioning Needs Recharging

If your Air Conditioning suddenly stops giving you the cold air you expect, it is a very good sign that your central air conditioner needs to be charged. Regardless of the model you have, air conditioners cannot run faultlessly for life. Sooner or later, one part or the other becomes affected. When this happens, it is highly advisable to let a professional get the Freon charged and conduct maintenance to save you money in the long run.

Call us Today to Schedule an Appointment

(918) 747-7566

How to Tell Your Air Conditioning Needs Recharging

Because there are several things that can go wrong with Air Conditioning, it is important to make sure that a low charge is an actual problem. When the central air conditioner needs to be charged, the first thing it does is blow out warm or room temperature air. Simply place your hand in front of the vent that releases air into your home and feels its temperature for a few minutes.

Checking thermostat readings is also a great way to detect charging problems. If your thermostat seems to be broken or malfunctioning, try to reset it and turn on the conditioner to check for any temperature changes. Broken thermostats are not necessarily a sign that you need recharging. When in doubt, it is better to call a specialist to diagnose the problem properly.

How to Conduct an Inspection At Home

Some maintenance tasks can be done at home while others require professional help. Learning the difference between the two can help you save money, time and prevent you from causing further damage to the system.

Fan

Apart from checking the thermostat and the temperature of the air coming out of air vents, you can do a visual inspection of the fan. When you turn your air conditioner, the fan should automatically start moving. If not, it might indicate a problem with the motor. Placing your hands inside can be very dangerous. This is a problem only professionals should fix.

Filters

It is quite easy for air filters to get clogged with dirt and debris. If you know how to check filters safely, make sure they are clean and unblocked. Sometimes all a cooling system needs to get up and running again is a thorough clean.

Frost

Leaking coolants tend to cause malfunctions in many air conditioners. Fortunately, leaks are easier to detect because they cause frost to build up on tubes, motors and other parts of the system. Should you notice a leak or frost build up, contact us immediately to help you fix the problem. Coolants are gaseous in nature and might cause harm when handled inappropriately.

If you manage to clean and sort out minor maintenance tasks without getting your air conditioner back in shape, most often than not, it means you need your Freon charged.

DIY vs. Professionals

Recharging the cooler at home seems like a great way to save money, but it is dangerous and should never be done yourself.  Owners lack the professional knowledge to do it properly, not to mention the licensing.

Professionals are the correct option here. Not only can they charge your system properly, you can also score other maintenance checks during the service appointment. By checking your entire system, they can diagnose and recommend the right solutions for your problem. You can easily avoid costly mistakes and prolong the life of your cooler at the same time.

How to Get Your Car Ready for Summer

There’s no time of the year like summer. And there’s no time better to own a car than when the sun comes out and the summer months roll around.

For some people, summer is the time for road trips, beach getaways, and driving backroads just for the heck of it. For others, it’s the time to let the top down and turn the tunes up. And for still others, it’s the busy time of the year, when kids and their friends need chauffeuring to sports games, movies, and day trips. Whatever you use your car for, it’s important to make sure that it’s completely ready for the summer.

Part 1 of 3: Get the car ready for the sunny days

Step 1: Purchase a sun shade. Buy a sunshade for your vehicle.

Bright sun can easily damage the interior of your car. The strength of the summer sun can fade the color of your dashboard and your front seats. This not only hurts the aesthetic of your interior but can also greatly diminish the resale value of your car.

To protect against this sun damage, purchase a sunshade, and keep it in your car at all times. Unfold the sunshade anytime you’re parked in direct sunlight.

  • Tip: When driving in the summer, try to park your car in the shade as much as is possible. Also crack your windows slightly when you leave your car in a hot environment.

close up of person turning on their air conditioning

Step 2: Check your air conditioning. Make sure your air conditioning is running well.

Chances are, you’ll need to be using your air conditioner a fair amount during the summer, which means you should make sure it’s working well. Even if your air conditioner appears to be working, it may not be working at full speed, which could be a problem during the hottest days of the summer.

Before the heat comes, have your air conditioner inspected by a reputable mechanic, such as one from Lofton Motorsports.

Part 2 of 3: Get the car safe before the summer driving

person hand checking their tires

Step 1: Check your tires Check to make sure your tires are in good shape.

By the time summer rolls around, your tires may be in poor shape. Driving in adverse road conditions during the winter, or driving with chains on, can sometimes cause unnatural wear and tear on your tires. You also may have winter tires and may be switching back to your summer tires.

Be sure to give your tires a visual inspection, to make sure they’re in good shape. If they’re not, purchase some quality tires before hitting the road this summer.

  • Tip: While checking your tires for wear and tear, make sure that they are properly inflated as well.

Step 2: Check your brakes. Make sure your brakes are in good pads.

It’s common for your brake pads to get worn out during the winter. This occurs for a number of reasons, mainly that there’s more traffic, a greater disparity between the resting temperature of the brakes and the operating temperature, and because you’re more likely to ride your brakes in adverse weather conditions.

When the summer comes, it’s a good idea to inspect your brake pads to make sure they’re in working condition. If you feel comfortable, you can check the pads yourself, or you can hire a trustworthy mechanic to perform a brake inspection.

Step 3: Get a comprehensive inspection. Get a comprehensive inspection for your vehicle.

While brakes and tires are the most important elements of your car to have inspected summer, a comprehensive safety inspection is also a good idea.

As you’re likely to drive your car more in the summer, you want to make sure that your oil is clean, your fluid levels are all sufficient, and all the electrical components of your car are operating properly.

Part 3 of 3: Get your car fun for the summer

person washing car

Step 1: Wash and detail your car. Get your car washed and thoroughly detailed.

Whether you have a second-hand sedan with a bunch of miles or a hot new convertible, you should get your car looking good for the summer.

Take your vehicle to a trusted auto detailer, and have it washed, waxed, and detailed, so it looks, feels, and smells like new.

  • Tip: The start of summer is also the best time to go through your car and clean it out.

Step 2: Add some fun to the interior. Add a little fun personality to the cabin of your car.

Since it’s summer, you’ll likely have a lot of people in your car, so it’s a good time to put a touch of your personality inside it.

Add a fun air freshener to your car, and maybe even some new seat covers. Stock your glove compartment with good CDs and you’ll be ready for the summer.

trunk with items in it

Step 3: Keep some summer essentials. Stock your trunk with summer essentials.

When the summer comes, it’s a good time to keep some essentials in your trunk; you never know when you might need them.

Put some water bottles or sports drinks in the trunk, along with some sunblock. If you’re going to spend the summer driving around your kids, fill the trunk with spare clothes, snacks, and maybe some emergency toys.

  • Tip: It’s a good idea to always keep a spare pair of sunglasses in your car during the summer. Sunglasses not only protect your eyes but can be an important safety measure when you are driving in bright conditions.

With just a few preparations, you can have your vehicle ready for whatever the summer throws at you. Summer is the best time of the year, so you want to make sure that your car is never holding you back from enjoying it to the fullest. Have one of Lofton Motorsport’s certified technicians inspect your battery and get it replaced if it is not holding a charge or giving you problems on a regular basis and be sure to have routine maintenance performed to keep your car in top shape.